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FPBench Contributors

Sources of benchmarks

FPBench includes a suite of benchmarks, drawn from published floating-point research. You can contribute your own benchmarks on the mailing list or on Github.

Contributors
MPI-SWS34
UW31
UPVD26
Utah17
Features used
Arithmetic115
Temporaries58
Comparison34
Loops29
Exponents18
Trigonometry14
Conditionals11
Domains
Textbook28
Mathematics25
Controls10
Science10
(unknown)39

These benchmarks have been contributed by multiple research groups. These contributions are listed here in chronological order. Each listed paper has all its evaluation examples incorporated into FPBench.

For each benchmark, FPBench records its name (preferably as used in a paper), descriptive information such as citations, and finally semantic metadata such as the precision used and preconditions.

The CPU group at the University of Utah

Features used
Arithmetic17
Temporaries8
Trigonometry2
Exponents1
Domains
(unknown)21

The Center for Parallel Computing at Utah group's FPTaylor project contributed 21 benchmarks, many short textbook examples and mathematical computations.

The AVA group at the Max Plank Institute for Software Systems

Features used
Arithmetic34
Temporaries21
Comparison5
Conditionals5
Domains
Science10
Mathematics5
Controls4
(unknown)18

The Automated Verification and Approximation group's Rosa project contributed 37 benchmarks, mostly drawn from scientific computations and control theory.

The LAMPS group at the Université de Perpignan Via Domitia

Features used
Arithmetic26
Temporaries26
Loops26
Comparison26
Conditionals6
Trigonometry2
Domains
Mathematics19
Controls6

The Laboratoire de Mathématiques et de Physique group's Salsa project contributed 25 benchmarks, all programs with loops drawn from mathematical algorithms and control theory.

The PLSE group at the University of Washington

Features used
Arithmetic31
Exponents14
Trigonometry9
Domains
Textbook28

The Programming Languages and Software Engineering group's Herbie project contributed 28 benchmarks, mostly drawn from Richard Hamming's Numerical Methods for Scientists and Engineers.